Part 2: Beginners Outdoor Training

Hello, welcome back, so how did you get on with your first taste of outdoor training?

Courtesy of Nike Women Outdoors
Courtesy of Nike Women Outdoors

The time has come to move things along and challenge the system a little more. So I’m going to outline the next level with a new set of exercises. Each one will be slightly more advanced than the previous set but similar movement patterns.
As usual begin with your pulse raiser, run, cycle, light jog. Remember it’s only a pulse raiser so nice and easy. Once you’ve picked your spot begin your dynamic stretches. This session will follow a similar course as the previous one so you can stick with the same warm-up.

So to recap:

Dynamic warm-up: Heal kicks to bum, high knee run, high kicks (opposite leg to opposite hand), walking lunges, hamstring stretch, light squats. Finish off with arm swings (windmill motion) and hip rotation. A dynamic warm-up can be what ever you want, as long as it replicates your session.

Session: 20/25 minutes

We’ll do five exercises and three sets. As before if you feel you can tackle 4 then go for it but maybe for the first few sessions start with 3 and build from there. Mark out a 20 metre area for your jog/run as before (which will follow each exercise). You maybe already at the level where you can increase the distance or better still be able to sprint there and back.

1. Split squat x 10 reps per leg (20 metre run there and back)

Split Squat
Split Squat

Stand with one foot in front of the other, split stance, feet pointing forward. Torso nice and upright. Bend at the knees and pulse down until your back knee almost touches the floor. Your front knee should be nicely inline with your front foot. After 10 reps swap legs

2. Reverse lunge x 10 per leg (Run)

Reverse Lunge
Reverse Lunge

Much the same as a forward lunge only in reverse. Take a big step back bending both knees until they are at 90 degrees. Drive back through the heel and push forward. Then repeat on the opposite leg

3. Spider-man press up x 10 (Run)

Spider Man Press Up
Spider Man Press Up

Begin this exercise much in the same way as the traditional press-up. Arms directly under the shoulders, lower until elbows are pointing behind you. As you lower to the ground bend one knee to bring it up to your elbow. As you press back up your leg returns to start position. Repeat with opposite leg. Do five leg raises on each side

4. Single leg squat thrust x 20 (Run)

Single Leg Squat Thrust
Single Leg Squat Thrust

Start in the usual press-up position, body straight. Bring one knee forward under your chest. Jump one leg forward and one leg back at the same time. Alternate as quickly as you can

5. Reverse Bear crawl (begin at start point and crawl 20 metres, then run back)

Reverse Bear Crawl
Reverse Bear Crawl

Get down on all fours. Place one hand and opposite foot backwards and walk. Changing sides as you go. This is a little bit harder than walking forward and should really test your endurance. Once you finish, if you can, crawl (forward) back!

On completion of your first set rest for the usual 90 secs then go again. Hopefully with a few weeks under your belt you should be able to slowly cut down your recovery time. Once you’ve completed your 3 sets go for a light warm-down jog around the park for about 5 mins. Follow this with your usual static stretch, remembering to focus on all the big muscle groups, quads, hamstrings, calves, glutes, groin and hip flexors. Finishing with some arm stretches.
Like before I’ve set a fairly low rep rate to begin with. As you get used to the new set of exercises you’ll soon be adding extra reps and sets onto your routine. As a bit of variation mix up your session by adding in the odd exercise from our previous list. It keeps your body guessing and avoids getting too used to the same movement patterns. It’s also more fun. Look to do this set at least twice a week but three times will really get you moving and closer to your fitness goals.

Remember these exercises are all about quality and not quantity. Always focus on your form and posture.

Good luck and look forward to our next set of exercises as we progress forward.

Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist. Chris Watson
Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist. Chris Watson

**Please note this programme is designed if you already have a basic level of fitness. Any medical problems or injuries please seek professional advice before attempting this session**

Part 1: Beginners Outdoor Training

Now you’ve made the decision to head outdoors to train, it’s time to get some structure into your session. As a regular gym goer you’ll probably have your own routine and level you feel comfortable with, certainly an idea of what stage you’re at in terms of what you deem hard or easy. So lets pretend that this is a whole new experience and start at the beginning.

As a new client I would assess your fitness level and always start fairly easy and go up through the gears as your potential unfolds. The harder you work the faster you’ll progress. Progression can be achieved with every session, no matter how small.

Shall we begin?

We’ve started with our pulse raiser, as mentioned in my previous article Outdoor Training, this can be a run or a cycle. I would recommend about 10 mins at a nice steady pace, nothing too energy sapping as there’s plenty time for that. This is followed by a dynamic warm-up. Usually base this around what you intend to do during your session. For example, if you are planning a forward lunge set, incorporate some walking lunges into your warm-up. This ensures your legs are ready for this movement. Always keep your warm up stretches dynamic at the start. Static stretches come at the end.

Week 1: Beginner session (1 hour)
10 mins pulse raiser – Run/cycle at a light steady pace

5-8mins dynamic stretch: mark a distance, either, with cones or between two trees about 10m apart. A good range for this session would be: Heal kicks to bum, high knee run, walking lunges, high kicks (touching opposite leg with opposite hand), light squats and a two step hamstring stretch (walk two paces, bend from the hip, keeping your legs straight and sweep your hands across the ground). Follow this with some hip rotation, arm swings (in a windmill motion) and a chest stretch.

Session: 20/25 mins
We’re going to start with five exercises and do 3 sets at varying rep rates (depending on the move). After each exercise mark a distance of around 20 metres and jog there and back to your start point. As you get stronger turn your jog into a sprint raising the intensity of your workout.

1. Squat x 12 reps (run 20m and back again)

Squat: Feet shoulder width apart, relaxed stance, back in natural state. In one smooth motion bend your knees, sticking out your bum (as if about to sit on a chair), finishing with your thighs parallel to the floor.
Squat:
Feet shoulder width apart, relaxed stance, back in natural state. In one smooth motion bend your knees, sticking out your bum (as if about to sit on a chair), finishing with your thighs parallel to the floor.

2. Forward Lunge x 12 (alternate legs, 6 per leg. run)

Lunge: Large step forward, with hands on hips. Leading leg parallel to the floor with your knee at 90 degrees and nicely in line with the front of the foot. Drive back up through the heal and repeat on the opposite leg. Make sure your back leg doesn't touch the floor
Lunge:
Large step forward, with hands on hips. Leading leg parallel to the floor with your knee at 90 degrees and nicely in line with the front of the foot. Drive back up through the heal and repeat on the opposite leg. Make sure your back leg doesn’t touch the floor

3. Press-up x 12 (run)

Press-up: Body in a nice straight line, head, shoulder and bum. Arms under your shoulders. Slowly press down keeping your arms nicely tucked in and elbows pointing backwards. Keeping abs braced let the chest lightly brush the floor and push back up.
Press-up:
Body in a nice straight line, head, shoulder and bum. Arms under your shoulders. Slowly press down keeping your arms nicely tucked in and elbows pointing backwards. Keeping abs braced let the chest lightly brush the floor and push back up.

4. Mountain Climber x 12 (run)

Mountain Climber: Begin in an upright press-up position.
Mountain Climber:
Begin in an upright press-up position.
Mountain Climber: Now bring your right knee to your left elbow, with a slight twist of your torso. That's one rep. Repeat on the opposite leg
Mountain Climber:
Now bring your right knee to your left elbow, with a slight twist of your torso. That’s one rep. Repeat on the opposite leg

5. Bear Crawl (begin at start point and crawl about 20m. If you can crawl back. If too hard, one way is fine to begin with. Then run)

Bear Crawl: Drop on all fours.
Bear Crawl:
Drop on all fours.
Bear Crawl: Place one hand and opposite foot forward, walk forward changing sides as you go. The lower you go the harder it gets
Bear Crawl:
Place one hand and opposite foot forward, walk forward changing sides as you go. The lower you go the harder it gets

On completion of your first set rest for about 90 secs and go again. Take longer if needed but try not to exceed 2 mins. The aim is to cut the rest time as you progress. Once you have competed 3 sets and rested for a couple of mins, go for a light warm-down jog for about 5 mins. This is followed by our static stretch. Be sure to stretch of all the relative muscles. Start with the big muscles like the quads, hamstrings and calves. Follow that with hip flexors, groin and glutes. Finishing off with some arm stretches. Always remember to do as it helps with your recovery.

I’ve set a fairly basic rep rate for this session as it’s a good starting point. Complete your first 3 sets and see how you feel. You will be able to tell fairly quickly if you need to add more reps to each exercise or even an extra set. Don’t be scared to push it that little bit each time. Try and fit this in at least twice a week but I’d recommend 3 times.

cw
Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist.
Chris Watson

Give it a go a see how you get on.

Next time we’ll look at ways to progress your session and the benefits of this kind of training.
Chris

**Please note this programme is designed if you already have a basic level of fitness. Any medical problems or injuries please seek professional advice before attempting this session**

7 Minute Work Out

7 Minutes Is All It Takes To Make The Olympics
7 Minutes Is All It Takes To Make The Olympics

I recently read an interesting article titled “7 minutes to get fit” with the catch line “Do twice a week. Job done”. Instantly I was intrigued, fit in two 7min sessions, this ought to be good, or too good to be true. So I began to read.

Studies have found you don’t need to spend hours in the gym to achieve your fitness goals. By following a quick, tight regime you can make a big difference to your overall fitness. The 7 minute work out is a form of high intensity interval training (HIIT) which means extremely intense bursts of activity followed by brief periods of recovery. Research suggests 7 energy sapping minutes broken down into 12 exercises is comparable to a run and weights session combined.

As a strong believer in hard work and time spent in the gym, or park, I was a tad sceptical of a quick fix solution. It sounded a little like a short-cut way of getting fit and I therefore questioned its impact.

So I decided to put the 7 minute workout to the test. I selected a reasonably balanced set of exercises to begin with. Well I’ve got to say it’s a pretty tough 7 minutes. The combination of aerobic and resistance moves gave me a very
balanced and challenging workout. It has been said that HIIT has shown time and again to “deliver numerous health benefits in much less time than traditional programs”. This all sounds very intriguing and exciting but it’s time to let
the public decide.

Having tested it on myself I decided to let my clients decide if it’s a way of training they’d be interested in. I selected a couple of willing participants and designed a program based on the 7 minute workout structure. Carefully mixing
a variation of cardio and resistance movement patterns and timing each exercise at the desired 30 second length (with a 10 second reset between).

My guinea pigs, whom have a fairly good level of fitness, found the session “pretty challenging” but really enjoyed the variation and tempo, finding competing against the clock both fun and exciting. They really felt they’d worked hard and gained a lot from this way of working. As I had a full session to fill we did 3 sets of 12 exercises with a two minute rest between each set. This added another level to the challenge.

Only time will tell if the 7 minute workout will return the fitness goals we’ve set but it was certainly a good start.

See below an example of a structured session containing 12 exercises:

This way of working, I believe, is best done as part of a 3 set, 2-3 times a week routine. Doing two 7 minute workouts per week will undoubtedly improve your fitness levels but I’d suggest doing 2-3 sets twice of three times per week
(if time allows) for maximum potential. So give it a go and see how you get on. I’d be very interested to know your thoughts on this training approach and if you feel it’s working..

A little bit of advice when attempting the 7 minute workout. It’s pretty tough and only recommended if you have a fairly good base fitness due to it’s high intensity nature. If you’ve not exercised in a while then I would suggest a more gentle approach to begin with and build up to the 7 minute workout.

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Always concentrate on form and doing the exercise correctly and please research any moves you’re not familiar with to avoid any injury or bad habits.

Remember these exercises are all about quality and not quantity. Always focus on your form and posture.

Good luck and look forward to our next set of exercises as we progress forward.

Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist. Chris Watson
Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist. Chris Watson

**Please note this programme is designed if you already have a basic level of fitness. Any medical problems or injuries please seek professional advice before attempting this session**

Avoid HARM for acute injuries (TOP TIPS)

Avoid HARM for acute injuries

After injuring yourself it can be difficult to know what to do. Do you use, ice or heat? Rest or movement? Elevation or massage? The asnwers to these questions are found in the type of injury that you have sustained.

Image

Acute Injuries

An acute injury is an injury with a sudden onset, usually as a result of some sort of impact or trauma, such as a fall, sprain or collision. Acute injuries are sudden and sharp, occur immediately (or within hours) and cause pain (possibly severe pain). With this form of injury, two acronyms are extremely valuable to remember: RICE and HARM.

RICE

The RICE acronym is one that should be followed as the four factors help to reduce swelling and inflammation that is likely to occur within the first stages of healing for an acute injury. RICE stands for:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Compression
  • Elevation

HARM

In contrast, the HARM acronym provides four factors that should be avoided with acute injuries, and stands for:

  • Heat
  • Alcohol
  • Running
  • Massage

HARM is extremely important to remember within the initial 48 hours following an acute injury because both heat and alcohol cause the blood vessels to dilate (open up) – this increases the bleeding in the injured area. Exercising the body part or massaging the area also has the same impact and can be detrimental to the healing process.

Chronic Injuries

Differing to acute injuries, chronic injuries can be subtle and may emerge slowly, with no known factor that triggered it. Chronic injuries may come and go, and may cause dull pain or soreness. Long standing low back pain is a classic example of a chronic injury, and often results from overuse and repetitive movements. However, if an acute injury is not effectively treated, it may lead to a chronic problem.

Heat therapy

Heat therapy is frequently used for chronic injuries or injuries that have no inflammation or swelling – such as nagging muscle or joint pain. Using a heat pad, or getting into a warm bath can help to increase the elasticity of joint connective tissues and stimulate blood flow, which can consequently aid pain relief. Whilst this is often a temporary solution, it can provide relief nonetheless.

Prodced by JB Physio and re-produced with permissions via twitter

Neuromuscular Control – What does it mean???

Neuromuscular Control – What Does it mean?

Neuromuscular control is certainly a complex procedure undertaken by the body but this has been made easier to understand by Vern Gambetta, a top performance coach from the U.S. Great reading and this will certainly improve that understanding of movement.

Movement is quite simple and from that wonderful simplicity comes the complexity of sports skill and performance. Twenty-five years ago in an attempt to better explain movement and how we should effectively train movement I came up with this simple diagram I call the Performance Paradigm.
NMC
It was somewhat like what Albert Szent-Gyorgi, once said, “Discovery consists in seeing what everyone else has seen and thinking what no one else has thought.” Essentially it is the stretch shortening cycle of muscle with a more global interpretation and proprioception brought into consideration. It is the basis for what some people call the Gambetta Method; to me it is common sense. I use this to evaluate movement efficiency or deficiency and then to guide training and if necessary rehab.

Essentially all movement is interplay between force reduction and force production. The quality of the movement is dictated by our proprioceptive system. We begin movement by loading the muscles – this is the force reduction phase. Basically this is the eccentric loading phase as a well as instantaneous isometric action that lends stiffness to the muscle. This is the most important component of the performance paradigm, but probably the most overlooked as well as the most misunderstood. There are several reasons for this; the most notable being that it is less measurable. Because it is more difficult to quantify we have tended to emphasize the more measurable component, force production. It is during the force reduction phase that most injuries occur. Think landing on one leg and tearing an ACL or planting to cut and spraining an ankle. It is during this phase that gravity has its greatest impact; it is literally trying to slam the body into the ground.

Once force has been reduced the subsequent result is force production. Force production is easy to see and easy to measure. Consequently it gets an inordinate amount of attention in the training process. We see it because it is the outcome. It is how high or far we jump. It is how much we lift. But just because it is easy to see and measure does not mean it should receive the inordinate emphasis, in training that it does. It must be stressed that it is the component of the performance paradigm that is highly dependent on the other phases.

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The third component of the Performance Paradigm is proprioception. Ultimately it is the glue that binds a whole functional program together is proprioception. Proprioception is the awareness of joint position and force derived from the sense receptors in the joints, ligaments, muscles, and tendons. It is that component that gives quality to the movement. “The quality of movement, in part, is dependent upon neurologic information fed back from proprioceptors within muscles and joints to the higher brain centers. The information returning to the central nervous system from the periphery includes “data” concerning tension of muscle fibers, joint angles, and position of the body being moved.” Logan and McKinney (Page 62) It is the feedback mechanism that positions the limbs to be able to achieve optimum efficiency. It is a component of movement that has been all but ignored in most traditional training programs until recently. It is highly trainable, especially if it is incorporated as part of a whole program.

It is almost too simple. Perhaps to appreciate proprioception we should look at the extreme case of a stroke victim that is able to return to normal movement patterns. Why can’t an athlete who has all their capacities enhance the quality of their movement by focusing on the same things that the stroke victim has to focus on to get back to function? The key to that is proprioception. We must strive to constantly change proprioceptive demand throughout the training program in order to enhance the quality of movement.

The performance paradigm will serve as a guide to determine how we train all components. It can also serve as a very useful guide to help us to evaluate movement from a slightly different context. It should serve as a guide to be more functional in our approach by emphasizing the timing and sequence of all three components of the paradigm. The synergistic interplay between them will produce the highest quality of movement.

It is very easy to get caught in the trap of measurable strength. How much you can lift or how many foot-pounds of force you can express on a dynamometer are meaningless numbers. Functional training does not depend on measurable strength. Quality of movement, coordination and rhythm are more important. The goal is always to apply the strength that is developed in the actual sport performance. How is the force expressed? Can you produce and reduce the force? Force production is all about acceleration, but often the key to movement efficiency and staying injury free is the ability to decelerate and stabilize in order to position the body to perform efficiently. A good functional training program will work on the interplay between force production, force reduction and stabilization. The end result is functional strength

Thanks for reading, see my next post on ACL and neuromuscular control!!!

TA Physio

prehab not rehab for sport injury prevention
prehab not rehab for sport injury prevention

Top Tips for Eccentric Training & Tendinopathy

Eccentric Training for Tendinopathy Injuries:

Image courtesy of http://www.injuryexplained.com/

Eccentric training is a form of training in which the muscle is worked as it lengthens. In contrast, concentric training involves a muscle working as it shortens. A good example of these can be observed within a bicep curl – as the elbow bends the biceps work concentrically and the muscles shorten as they work. However, as the elbow then straightens the bicep muscles are lengthening, but they continue to contract and work as they control the movement.

Physiology

It has been found that the faster a muscle contracts concentrically (shortening), the lower the tension it is able to generate (1). Tension in muscle fibres when lengthening (eccentric) is considerably greater than when muscle fibres are shortening (2).

Previous studies have shown that when a muscle is eccentrically lengthened, the energy requirement falls substantially in comparison to concentric contractions because ATP breakdown and heat production are both slowed (2). Furthermore, with increased heat generation during concentric work, there is a concurrent increase in cellular metabolism. Thus, more waste products will be generated with concentric work, potentially leading to chemical irritation of nerves and eventually pain (6).

Tendinopathy

Tendons are the extremities of a muscle that attaches to bone and injury to tendons can occur from sudden trauma, overuse or repetitive strain. Tendon injuries account for 30-50% of injuries in sports (4). Specifically, chronic problems caused by overuse of tendons result in 30% of all running-related injuries, and elbow tendon injuries can be as high as 40% in tennis players (8). Incidence of patellar tendonopathy is reported to be as high as 32% and 45% in basketball and volleyball players, respectively (5). It is therefore important to quickly diagnose and treat such injuries with physiotherapy.

Eccentric training for tendinopathies

The Alfredson et al (1) protocol has frequently been used since its production in 1998 and appears to be a safe, effective method of implementing the eccentric training program for tendinopathies. However, this protocol was produced for and used in the treatment of achilles tendinopathies and their exact recommendations may not be appropriate for all tendons or regions.

The Alfredson protocol used three sets of 15 repetitions of bent knee and straight knee calf raises, twice a day, seven days per week over 12 weeks. Athletes were told to work through pain, only ceasing exercise if pain became disabling. Training load was increased in 5 kg increments with use of a backpack that allowed for the addition of the weight once training with bodyweight was pain free. The eccentric phase of the exercise should be performed relatively slowly, counting to 3-4 seconds as you complete the movement. The concentric phase should be avoided and the other limb can return you to the starting position of the exercise.

All of the subjects within the initial study (1) who used this protocol, returned to pre-injury activity levels and found a significant decrease in pain with a significant increase in strength.

According to Lorenz & Reiman (6), the physiotherapist may use the Alfredson protocol for an example of volume and frequency of training, but addition of weights and resistance should be dictated by the amount of pain experienced by the individual, and the exercises should be dictated by a physiotherapist to ensure correct technique and suitability of exercises.

Curwin (3) has also proposed a method to determine training load in eccentric training for tendon injuries. One significant difference between Curwin’s and Alfredson’s programs is that the athlete performs both the concentric and eccentric portion of the exercise in Curwin’s program, with the eccentric portion being performed faster. In Curwin’s protocol, they suggest that the athlete should experience pain and fatigue between 20 and 30 repetitions at a given load, when performing three sets of 10 repetitions.

Their rationale for experiencing pain is based on the premise that exercise load should be determined by the tendon tolerance, which is indicated by pain experienced during the exercise. If there is no pain after 30 repetitions, the stimulus is inadequate. Either load or the speed of exercise performance should be increased, but not both simultaneously.

Based on the clinical experience of the authors and others (7), it is recommended that 6-12 repetitions over four sets be completed to emphasize strength in the muscle-tendon complex. The athletes use the load from the six repetition resistance and build up to twelve repetitions prior to increasing load again. This process helps to maintain safe and progressive eccentric training. Additionally, the authors advocate three to four sessions per week instead of every day.

Lorenz & Reiman (6) suggest that the physiotherapist or athlete do not perform the concentric portion of the exercise or perform it with the assistance of the uninvolved limb, followed by having the athlete perform the eccentric portion of the exercise independently. Based on clinical experience, the concentric portion of the exercise can be attempted without assistance once non-sport/day-to-day activities, like walking, stair climbing and washing, are pain free.

As with eccentric exercise, progression of the concentric portion of exercise should involve a gradual increase. Once the concentric portion of exercise is pain free, the athletes can begin jogging or more sport specific activities.

References

1. Alfredson H, Pietila T, Jonsson P, & Lorentzon R. (1998) Heavy-load eccentric calf muscle training for treatment of chronic Achilles tendinosis. Am J Sports Med. 26: 360-366.

2. Curtin N A & Davies R E. (1970) Chemical and mechanical changes during stretching of activated frog muscle. Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol. 37: 619-626.

3. Curwin S L. (1996) Tendon injuries: Pathophysiology and treatment. In: Athletic Injuries and Rehabilitation. J Zachazewski, DJ Magee, WS Quillen, ed. Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders Co. 27-54.

4. Khan K M & Scott A. (2009) Mechanotherapy: how physical therapists’ prescription of exercise promotes tissue repair. Br J Sports Med. 43: 247-251.

5. Lian O B, Engebretsen L & Bahr R. (2005) Prevalence of jumper’s knee among elite athletes from different sports: a cross-sectional study. Am J Sports Med. 33: 561-567.

6.Lorenz D & Reiman M. (2011) The role and implementation of eccentric training in athletic rehabilitation: Tendinopathy, hamstring strains, and acl reconstruction. International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy 6(1): 27-44.

7. Ratamess N A, Alvar B A, Evetoch T K, et al. (2009) Progression models in resistance training for healthy adults: ACSM Position Stand. Med Sci Sports Exerc.  41(3): 687-708.

8 Sharma P & Maffulli N. (2006) Biology of tendon injury: healing, modeling, and remodeling. J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 6: 181-190.

Blog produced by www.jbphysio.co.uk and re-produced with permission via twitter

10,000 Steps

10,000 STEPS A DAY:
“10,000 steps a day keeps the doctor away”

How many steps do you walk each day?

Maybe you have heard the guidelines about walking 10,000 steps per day. How far is 10,000 steps anyway? The average person’s stride length is approximately 2.5 feet long. That means it takes just over 2,000 steps to walk one mile, and 10,000 steps is close to 5 miles.

A sedentary person may only average 1,000 to 3,000 steps a day. For these people adding steps has many health benefits. I have outlined the basic 10,000 steps program, but also added a commentary below.

A reasonable goal for most people is to increase average daily steps each week by 500 per day until you can easily average 10,000 per day. Example: If you currently average 3000 steps each day, your goal for week one is 3500 each day. Your week 2 goal is 4000 each day. Continue to increase each week and you should be averaging 10,000 steps by the end of 14 weeks.

Wearing a pedometer is an easy way to track your steps each day. Start by wearing the pedometer every day for one week. Put it on when you get up in the morning and wear it until bed time. Record your daily steps in a log or notebook. By the end of the week you will know your average daily steps. You might be surprised how many (or how few) steps you get in each day.

There are many ways to increase your daily steps. Use your imagination and come up with your own list:
-Take a walk with your spouse, child, or friend
-Walk the dog
-Use the stairs instead of the elevator
-Park farther from the shop
-Better yet, walk to the shops
-Get off the tube one stop early
-Get up to change the channel
-Window shop
-Plan a walking meeting
-Walk over to visit a neighbor
-Get outside to walk around the garden or do a little weeding

Continue to track your daily steps and/or mileage; and keep notes on how you feel, how your body is improving, or other changes you are making to improve your health.

If you are in very poor physical condition or at any point you feel that you are progressing too rapidly slow down a bit and try smaller increases. If you have any health concerns seek your physician’s advice prior to starting or changing your exercise routine.

Notice: We have outlined the standard 10,000 step program because so many people ask about it. This is a good program to help get people motivated, or to get sedentary people moving. It is however our recommendation that most individuals fit 30 to 60 minutes of dedicated walking (or other exercise) into their routine at least 3 to 4 days a week. You can start with as little as ten minutes per day and gradually increase your walking routine.
Courtesy of the walking site

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