Part 1: Beginners Outdoor Training

Now you’ve made the decision to head outdoors to train, it’s time to get some structure into your session. As a regular gym goer you’ll probably have your own routine and level you feel comfortable with, certainly an idea of what stage you’re at in terms of what you deem hard or easy. So lets pretend that this is a whole new experience and start at the beginning.

As a new client I would assess your fitness level and always start fairly easy and go up through the gears as your potential unfolds. The harder you work the faster you’ll progress. Progression can be achieved with every session, no matter how small.

Shall we begin?

We’ve started with our pulse raiser, as mentioned in my previous article Outdoor Training, this can be a run or a cycle. I would recommend about 10 mins at a nice steady pace, nothing too energy sapping as there’s plenty time for that. This is followed by a dynamic warm-up. Usually base this around what you intend to do during your session. For example, if you are planning a forward lunge set, incorporate some walking lunges into your warm-up. This ensures your legs are ready for this movement. Always keep your warm up stretches dynamic at the start. Static stretches come at the end.

Week 1: Beginner session (1 hour)
10 mins pulse raiser – Run/cycle at a light steady pace

5-8mins dynamic stretch: mark a distance, either, with cones or between two trees about 10m apart. A good range for this session would be: Heal kicks to bum, high knee run, walking lunges, high kicks (touching opposite leg with opposite hand), light squats and a two step hamstring stretch (walk two paces, bend from the hip, keeping your legs straight and sweep your hands across the ground). Follow this with some hip rotation, arm swings (in a windmill motion) and a chest stretch.

Session: 20/25 mins
We’re going to start with five exercises and do 3 sets at varying rep rates (depending on the move). After each exercise mark a distance of around 20 metres and jog there and back to your start point. As you get stronger turn your jog into a sprint raising the intensity of your workout.

1. Squat x 12 reps (run 20m and back again)

Squat: Feet shoulder width apart, relaxed stance, back in natural state. In one smooth motion bend your knees, sticking out your bum (as if about to sit on a chair), finishing with your thighs parallel to the floor.

Squat:
Feet shoulder width apart, relaxed stance, back in natural state. In one smooth motion bend your knees, sticking out your bum (as if about to sit on a chair), finishing with your thighs parallel to the floor.

2. Forward Lunge x 12 (alternate legs, 6 per leg. run)

Lunge: Large step forward, with hands on hips. Leading leg parallel to the floor with your knee at 90 degrees and nicely in line with the front of the foot. Drive back up through the heal and repeat on the opposite leg. Make sure your back leg doesn't touch the floor

Lunge:
Large step forward, with hands on hips. Leading leg parallel to the floor with your knee at 90 degrees and nicely in line with the front of the foot. Drive back up through the heal and repeat on the opposite leg. Make sure your back leg doesn’t touch the floor

3. Press-up x 12 (run)

Press-up: Body in a nice straight line, head, shoulder and bum. Arms under your shoulders. Slowly press down keeping your arms nicely tucked in and elbows pointing backwards. Keeping abs braced let the chest lightly brush the floor and push back up.

Press-up:
Body in a nice straight line, head, shoulder and bum. Arms under your shoulders. Slowly press down keeping your arms nicely tucked in and elbows pointing backwards. Keeping abs braced let the chest lightly brush the floor and push back up.

4. Mountain Climber x 12 (run)

Mountain Climber: Begin in an upright press-up position.

Mountain Climber:
Begin in an upright press-up position.

Mountain Climber: Now bring your right knee to your left elbow, with a slight twist of your torso. That's one rep. Repeat on the opposite leg

Mountain Climber:
Now bring your right knee to your left elbow, with a slight twist of your torso. That’s one rep. Repeat on the opposite leg

5. Bear Crawl (begin at start point and crawl about 20m. If you can crawl back. If too hard, one way is fine to begin with. Then run)

Bear Crawl: Drop on all fours.

Bear Crawl:
Drop on all fours.

Bear Crawl: Place one hand and opposite foot forward, walk forward changing sides as you go. The lower you go the harder it gets

Bear Crawl:
Place one hand and opposite foot forward, walk forward changing sides as you go. The lower you go the harder it gets

On completion of your first set rest for about 90 secs and go again. Take longer if needed but try not to exceed 2 mins. The aim is to cut the rest time as you progress. Once you have competed 3 sets and rested for a couple of mins, go for a light warm-down jog for about 5 mins. This is followed by our static stretch. Be sure to stretch of all the relative muscles. Start with the big muscles like the quads, hamstrings and calves. Follow that with hip flexors, groin and glutes. Finishing off with some arm stretches. Always remember to do as it helps with your recovery.

I’ve set a fairly basic rep rate for this session as it’s a good starting point. Complete your first 3 sets and see how you feel. You will be able to tell fairly quickly if you need to add more reps to each exercise or even an extra set. Don’t be scared to push it that little bit each time. Try and fit this in at least twice a week but I’d recommend 3 times.

cw

Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist.
Chris Watson

Give it a go a see how you get on.

Next time we’ll look at ways to progress your session and the benefits of this kind of training.
Chris

**Please note this programme is designed if you already have a basic level of fitness. Any medical problems or injuries please seek professional advice before attempting this session**

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